5 Winners and Losers of the Week in Business

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Companies can make brilliant moves, but often, things don't work out quite as planned. From a beverage company refashioning refrigerators to a CEO with some regrettable comments going viral seven years after they were originally said, here's a rundown of this week's smartest moves and biggest blunders in the business world.

Walmart (WMT) -- Loser

The world's largest retailer has often been portrayed as an all-weather performer. When the economy's strong, folks go shopping. When the economy's weak, department store shoppers trade down to Walmart for the bargains. Well, what happens when the shoppers don't show up?

Walmart shares dipped on Thursday after surprising the market with a decline in same-store sales. The chain's guidance for the current quarter also wasn't very inspiring.

SodaStream (SODA) -- Winner

Shares of SodaStream hit a new 52-week this week after it hosted its annual Analyst Day. One of the company's revelations is that it's working on more refrigerators that feature SodaStream technology to serve carbonated water from their front dispensers. Its partnership with Samsung resulted in the first fridge with that functionality hitting the market recently.


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However, SodaStream promises that more models are on the way. It also discussed efforts to get SodaStream syrup incorporated into the refrigerators so users can get flavored soda right from that fridge's water dispenser.

J.C. Penney (JCP) -- Loser

Things aren't getting any better at the department store chain, which saw sales plunge 25 percent last year. J.C. Penney kicked off the new fiscal year with a steep deficit as same-store sales tumbled 16.6 percent. No one was expecting the retailer to turn things the instant it sent former-CEO Ron Johnson packing, but the company did seem to suggest that things were getting better in a recent ad that thanked customers for returning.

"We're happy to say you've come back to us," concludes the television commercial.

Disney (DIS) -- Winner

The family entertainment giant is giving live-streaming of its ABC network a shot. Between now and the end of June, residents of New York City and Philadelphia will be able to stream ABC shows as they air, either on their PCs or through the fittingly rebranded Watch ABC app for iPhones, iPads, and iPod touch devices.

Disney is suggesting that it will likely require verification that those taking advantage of the streams have active pay TV accounts after the trail ends in June. Disney doesn't want to encourage cord cutting here, especially since it has ESPN and the Disney Channel to protect. It's still a smart move for a company that has always been a step ahead of the competition when it comes to embracing digital delivery.

Abercrombie & Fitch (ANF) -- Loser

Something that Abercrombie & Fitch's CEO said in 2006 -- yes, 2006 -- has come back to haunt him.

"Candidly, we go after the cool kids," CEO Mike Jefferies said in a Salon interview seven years ago. "We go after the attractive all-American kid with a great attitude and a lot of friends. A lot of people don't belong [in our clothes], and they can't belong."

He didn't stop there.

"Are we exclusionary," he asked rhetorically. "Absolutely. Those companies that are in trouble are trying to target everybody: young, old, fat, skinny. But then you become totally vanilla."

The comments refer to Abercrombie & Fitch's decision to not stock XL sizes or pants beyond size 10. Jefferies is catching a lot of heat for those comments with activists encouraging boycotts, and this week, an aspiring director even pulled off a well-publicized stunt by buying Abercrombie & Fitch clothing and handing it out to the homeless.

Motley Fool contributor Rick Munarriz owns shares of Walt Disney and SodaStream. The Motley Fool recommends SodaStream and Walt Disney. The Motley Fool owns shares of SodaStream and Walt Disney.

5 Winners and Losers of the Week in Business
Percentage of U.S. population who visited in March: 14.2%
 Revenue: $73.3 billion
 1-year stock price change: 27.56%
 Store category: Discount & variety stores

Target (TGT) was the second most-visited discount retailer in the U.S. during March, behind only Walmart. One reason was the number of Target stores. The company has been attempting to take on Walmart by adding grocery sections to more  stores, and by offering groceries at competitive prices. This has helped Target maintain strong financial performance despite the weak economy and its additional spending on its launch in Canada. Most Americans surveyed by the American Customer Satisfaction Index rated Target well: It finished in a three-way tie for second place in the department and discount store category, behind Nordstrom.
Percentage of U.S. population who visited in March: 18.2%
 Revenue: $13.6 billion
 1-year stock price change: -3.89%
 Store category: Fast food

As recently as 2011, Taco Bell (YUM) was struggling to keep competitor Chipotle (CMG) from taking its customers, with flat or negative same-store sales growth in each quarter that year. This changed in early 2012, when Taco Bell released the Doritos Locos taco, a hard taco with the flavor of Doritos nacho chips. That item help the company increase comparable sales in every quarter of 2012, as the company sold more than 1 million of them a day. In March, Taco Bell CEO Greg Creed told The Daily Beast the company had hired 15,000 workers just to meet demand for the Doritos Locos taco in 2012. Last year, the company's sales increased by $1 billion to $11.8 billion, and net income rose by roughly $300 million to $1.6 billion.
Percentage of U.S. population who visited in March: 18.9%
 Revenue: $123.1 billion
 1-yr. stock price change: 27.56%
 Store category: Drugstore

CVS (CVS)  is the top provider of prescriptions in the country, filling or managing more than 1 billion prescriptions a year. It has operates in 45 states, and 75% of the people in the markets it serves live within three miles one of the company's 7,400 retail stores. Last year, CVS estimated it gained millions of new customers following a dispute between Walgreens (WAG) and Express Scripts (ESRX), the prescription management service. Even after the dispute was resolved, CVS was able to retain many customers who used to fill prescriptions at Walgreens. In the first quarter of 2013, the company's revenue grew 5%, as same-store sales grew 4%.

Percentage of U.S. population who visited in March: 22.7%
 Revenue: $71.6 billion
 1-year stock price change: 42.17%
 Store category: Drugstore

Despite CVS's gains, Walgreens is still the most visited drugstore in the country. According to RetailSails, the company has the most stores, at 7,890, and the largest average store, at 14,400 square feet, among all drugstore chains. The company's tenure in first place may not last, however, thanks to that now-resolved dispute with Express Scripts. The company spent nearly nine months without using Express Scripts, the largest prescription management service in the country, losing an estimated 60 million prescriptions to rivals. CVS estimates that it will retain roughly half of the Walgreen's customers it gained as a result of the squabble.
Percentage of U.S. population who visited in March: 22.8%
 Revenue: $2.5 billion
 1-Year stock price change: 11.84%
 Store category: Fast food

In 2011, Wendy's (WEN) overall sales surpassed Burger King's, making it the second-largest burger chain in the U.S. But Wendy's growth has actually been quite modest as of late, with same-store sales in North America growing just 1.6% from 2011 to 2012. (In fact, Wendy's first-quarter profit just tumbled 83%.) Wendy's is in the process of remodeling many of its restaurants with more comfortable seating arrangements and flat-screen televisions. However, not all of its stores are getting upgraded. The company announced in March it was going to shutter as many as 130 underperforming stores. Last year, the company also made significant changes in its marketing strategy and menu in order to attract customers who have been lured in by chains such as Panera, which promotes healthier food at slightly higher prices.
Percentage of U.S. population who visited in March: 23.9%
 Revenue: $13.3 billion
 1-year stock price change: 12.46%
 Store category: Coffee

There is a reason Starbucks (SBUX) is No. 1 in the coffee category: Sales in the U.S. grew by nearly 346% between 2001 and 2012, and the number of stores grew by 195%. The company has struggled in the U.S. in the past several years, but its stock has continued to rise as global sales have helped to pick up the slack. Worldwide, Starbucks revenue grew by 7% in 2012 compared to 2011. This included a 15% growth in the Asia/Pacific region. In its early years, the company did not place much emphasis on its food items. However, that has changed in recent years, especially following the purchase of Bay Area pastry chain La Boulangerie. However, some industry analysts remain skeptical of Starbucks' ability to compete for customers' breakfast purchases.
Percentage of U.S. population who visited in March: 24.3%
 Revenue: $2.0 billion
 1-year stock price change: N/A
 Store category: Fast food

The last decade or so has been especially tumultuous for Burger King: It was taken private in two separate instances, in 2002 and in 2010, and became a public company again last June. The company hasn't performed well in years, with an average growth rate of -0.1% between 2001 and 2013, which allowed Wendy's to take its No. 2 burger chain title. A restructuring that began after the second buyout in 2010, in which many stores were sold to franchisees, has cut deeply into the company's sales. But not all news for Burger King is bad news: Nearly one quarter of Americans visited a Burger King in March.
Percentage of U.S. population who visited in March: 37.8%
 Revenue: N/A
 1-year stock price change: N/A
 Store category: Fast food

Between 2001 and 2012, Subway's sales in the U.S. grew nearly 169%, while the number of stores grew nearly 93%. Subway is by far the largest fast food chain in the U.S., with almost 26,000 restaurants. The company has been able to fuel its large growth through both international expansion and a domestic focus on healthy eating, most notably using ads featuring Jared Fogle -- a man who lost an impressive amount of weight while regularly eating the company's sandwiches. In 2013, for the ninth year in a row, Subway received the highest score in the country in a Harris Poll EquiTrend study in the "quick service restaurants" category and was named brand of the year by that group.
Percentage of U.S. population who visited in March: 38.8%
 Revenue: $469.2 billion
 1-year  stock price change: 34.29%
 Store category: Discount & variety stores

Walmart (WMT) is by far the largest retailer in the U.S. and in many parts of the world. It was recently ranked No. 1 in the Fortune 500 after it reported more than $469 billion in worldwide revenue in 2012. While international markets are critical to growth, the U.S. market provides the majority of its revenue: U.S. sales comprise 62% of the company's sales. In the last five years, Walmart has added 450 U.S. stores, a 13% increase overall. However, according to Bloomberg, the company's U.S. workforce has dropped 1.4% in that time frame, leading customers to complain about a lack of inventory and longer check-out lines -- and to defect to rivals such as Target and Costco. In February, the American Customer Service Index ranked Walmart the lowest of all discount retailers, the sixth year in a row the chain has held or tied for the last place spot.

Percentage of U.S. population who visited in March: 49.0%
 Revenue: $27.6 billion
1-year stock price change: 6.92%
 Store category: Fast food<

Almost half of all Americans visited a McDonald's (MCD) in March, but, U.S. sales of $8.8 billion weren't even the company's largest revenue segment last year. Rather it was the company's sales in Europe of $10.8 billion. According to Technomic, McDonald's same-store sales grew at an annualized rate of nearly 5% from 2001 through 2012. However, this has slowed recently: The company's systemwide sales in the United States rose by just 0.3% from the year before in the final quarter of 2012. The company is already so large that its bottom line is deeply linked to global economic conditions, leaving it unable to raise prices for now. In order to boost sales, McDonald's CEO Bob Thompson told CNBC the company may try allowing U.S. stores to serve breakfast all day.

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