Facebook Tries to Prop Up Shares While Zuckerberg Stands Pat

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

The iPhone 5 launch on Wednesday, Sept. 12, is sure to be the most important event for tech investors this year. The Motley Fool will be hosting a live chat where our top tech analysts will answer your questions and break down what the announcement means for Apple and tech investors everywhere. Be sure to swing by Fool.com at 12:45 p.m. ET next Wednesday for all your coverage of Apple's next big announcement.

 With Facebook (NAS: FB) shares continuing to get crushed to new lows seemingly every month since its IPO, it's apparent that investors aren't too keen on holding onto shares. However, there's one investor who's unsurprisingly not going anywhere: CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg.

The social network outlined a number of events in a fresh 8-K SEC filing. One of the more relevant disclosures was that Zuckerberg has committed to holding all of his existing shares, all 444 million Class B shares and 60 million Class B shares issuable from options, for at least 12 months. Two other directors, Marc Andreessen and Donald Graham, also said they have no intention to sell any shares other than to cover certain tax liabilities.


That's three big votes of confidence from insiders who are willing to stand pat on their Facebook positions as the stock continues to hit new lows and other insiders are cashing out, most notably Peter Thiel and Dustin Moskovitz. Don't forget that Zuckerberg did cash out a little over $1 billion through the IPO already, so I don't think he's at risk of not being able to pay his electric bill anytime soon.

The company also made two other important moves that are clearly aimed at supporting the share price, since their continued weakness is weighing on internal morale. Facebook will be effectively buying back roughly 101 million shares while simultaneously waiving the "market stand-off" provisions that employees are subject to that previously prevented them from selling shares until the next lockup expiration on Nov. 14.

The company is moving up employees' eligible sale date forward by a few weeks and estimates that on Oct. 29, there will be a total of 234 million shares held by employees that will be eligible for sale.

By reducing the number of shares trading while spreading out the number of shares that might be unloaded, the hope is to help provide some support for the share price. It's a temporary move aimed for short-term stabilization. This does nothing to address longer-term fundamentals or strategic direction, though.

Facebook still needs to sway advertisers away from Google (NAS: GOOG) and accept the inevitable split with Zynga (NAS: ZNGA) , all while it ramps up mobile monetization. But then again, it needs upbeat employees to accomplish those goals.

For more on Facebook's prospects, don't miss this premium report all about the social network. I've outlined the major opportunities and risks facing the company, as well as what it would take before I'd recommend buying shares. Grab your copy today and get free updates!

The article Facebook Tries to Prop Up Shares While Zuckerberg Stands Pat originally appeared on Fool.com.

Fool contributorEvan Niuholds no position in any company mentioned. Check out hisholdings and a short bio. The Motley Fool owns shares of Apple and Facebook.Motley Fool newsletter serviceshave recommended buying shares of Facebook, Apple, and Google and creating a bull call spread position in Apple. We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe thatconsidering a diverse range of insightsmakes us better investors. Try any of our Foolish newsletter servicesfree for 30 days. The Motley Fool has adisclosure policy.

Copyright © 1995 - 2012 The Motley Fool, LLC. All rights reserved. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Read Full Story

Want more news like this?

Sign up for Finance Report by AOL and get everything from business news to personal finance tips delivered directly to your inbox daily!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners