3 FTSE Shares Being Crushed This Month

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LONDON -- The FTSE 100 (INDEX: ^FTSE) is up 0.6% to 5,660 as I write on hopes that European leaders and the European Central bank will follow through on their promises to do what it takes to save the euro.

But even if our big blue chip shares are stabilizing as a result, some individual companies have seen their share prices slump this month. Here are three from the FTSE indexes that have suffered a torrid July but might just be looking like bargains now.

Ferrexpo (ISE: FXPO.L) Shares in Ferrexpo have suffered another poor month and are currently down 15% to 183 pence from their end-of-June price of 215 pence. That adds to a pretty bad year all around, with the shares having peaked at 366 pence in early February, meaning they've lost exactly 50% since then.


The iron ore processor and dealer's troubles stem from lowering expectations related to the global slump in demand for metals, minerals, and other commodities, which has also affected the mining sector. But at today's price, and even with forecasts suggesting a 30% fall in earnings per share this year, the shares are on a very low price-to-earnings ratio of 4.2, falling to 3.6 for 2013 -- and there's no real debt on the books.

Can the shares really fall much further? We might well be at a nice point for a recovery now.

Kesa (ISE: KESA.L)
Kesa Electricals
didn't shrug off its woes when it got rid of U.K. high-street chain Comet, and the shares have had another bad month, falling 23% over the month to 38.25 pence due to the dire economic conditions the continue to afflict much of Europe.

The firm, which owns the Darty and Datart chains in addition to several other European brands, has now seen its shares drop from a year high of 131 pence -- an overall 70% fall.

But again, things could be overdone -- at least with a long-term view -- as current forecasts suggest a reasonably well-covered dividend of 7.4% for 2013 and a P/E of less than eight.

Renold (ISE: RNO.L) British engineering has been out of favor for a while, and Renold is one firm in the sector that has had a bad month as a result, falling 15% from July's high point of 35.5 pence to today's 30.3 pence. But looking at the bigger picture, July might just be a blip in an otherwise nice recovery.

In May, the industrial chain and gear manufacturer reported revenue up 9.6%, with adjusted earnings per share having more than doubled from 2 pence to 4.2 pence. Net debt rose in absolute terms but fell as a proportion of EBITDA. There was no dividend to be paid, but the firm did say it "will consider future dividend policy in the light of performance and, in particular, free cash flow from the business."

The debt on the balance sheet is a problem, but with forecasts putting the shares on a forward P/E of only 5.7, there's room for some risk to be taken there.

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The article 3 FTSE Shares Being Crushed This Month originally appeared on Fool.com.

Alan does not own any shares mentioned in this article. The Motley Fool has adisclosure policy. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe thatconsidering a diverse range of insightsmakes us better investors. Try any of our Foolish newsletter servicesfree for 30 days.

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