Best Summer Jobs For Teens In 2012

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Summer 2012 may well be the season of the teen job recovery. After two years of unrelenting bad news for teens, and the daunting current statistic of 24.6 percent teen unemployment, the job market is finally looking promising for those aged 16 to 19.

Almost 160,000 teens between those ages found summer jobs in May, which was more than twice the number of jobs that were added last May, according to a recent study by the outplacement company, Challenger, Gray & Christmas Inc.

Summer jobs are critical for young people, providing what Michael Saltsman, an expert on teen employment, calls "an invisible curriculum," teaching teens the things they will need to succeed in the world of work. "The experiencing of dealing with a manager and customers and getting up early make you a more viable candidate," says Saltsman, a research fellow with the Employment Policies Institute. "The value is a lot more than a paycheck, because these are things you aren't necessarily exposed to in school."

Still, with the U.S. economy struggling, America's youngest workers will face tough competition from college students and older, unemployed workers. Additionally, many jobs that teens used to fill, such as grocery store cashier, are being eliminated due to automation, says Saltsman.

So what are the best jobs for teens this summer? Which have the most openings? AOL Jobs studied data from the U.S. Census Bureau with Saltsman, and found the seven occupations (along with their average pay) having the highest rate of teen employment.

7 PHOTOS
Summer Jobs For Teens
See Gallery
Best Summer Jobs For Teens In 2012

Working Teens Who Are Cashiers: 14.7 percent

Average Hourly Salary: $9.73

States With Highest Concentration of Jobs: Mississippi, Alabama and New Hampshire

Outlook: Employment of cashiers is expected to grow by seven percent by 2010. 

Looking for a job as a cashier? Click here get started.

Working Teens Who Are Waiters/Waitresses: 7.2 percent

Average Hourly Salary: $10.05

States With The Highest Concentration of Jobs: Nevada, Florida and Hawaii

Outlook: Employment of waiters/waitresses is expected to grow nine percent by 2020. 

Looking for a job as a waiter or waitress? Click here get started.

Working Teens Who Work As Retail Salespersons: 6.4 percent

Average Hourly Salary: $12.08

States With Highest Concentration of Jobs: Florida, Georgia and Hawaii

Outlook: Employment of retail sales workers is expected to grow 17 percent by 2020

Looking for a job in retail sales? Click here get started.

Working Teens Who Work In Food Preparation: 8.5 percent

Average Hourly Salary: $10.30

States With Highest Concentration of Jobs: Nevada, Hawaii and Montana

Outlook: Employment of cooks and food preparers is expected to grow nine percent by 2020.

Looking for a job in food preparation? Click here get started.

Working Teens Who Are Movers: 3.8 percent

Average Hourly Salary: $12.62

States With Highest Concentration of Jobs: Tennessee, Kentucky and Indiana

Outlook: Employment of movers is expected to grow 14 percent by 2020. 

Looking for a job as a mover? Click here get started.

Working Teens Who Are Store/Warehouse Clerks: 2.9 percent

Average Hourly Salary: $11.66

States With Highest Concentration of Jobs: New Hampshire, New Jersey and Florida

Outlook: Employment of store clerks is expected to grow by two percent by 2020, as more of their duties become automated.

Looking for a job as a clerk? Click here get started.

Working Teens Who Are Babysitters or Daycare Workers: 2.8 percent

Average Hourly Salary: $9.34

States with Highest Concentration of Jobs: New York, Kentucky and South Dakota

Outlook: Employment of child care workers is expected to grow 20 percent by 2020 as demand for preschool programs grows.

Looking for a job in child care? Click here get started.

of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION
Read Full Story

People are Reading