Jobs Drought Is Ending, Manpower Survey Says

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employers to increase hiring in third quarter

The recent slowdown in hiring may have caused some Americans who are looking for work to shudder. But a new survey of employers suggests that the summer months may give dispirited job seekers a much-needed boost.

According to data compiled by ManpowerGroup, 92 percent of U.S. employers plan to increase hiring or maintain current staffing levels through the end of September.

The staffing company's latest Employment Outlook Survey also shows that hiring trends are up in all 50 states, and in all of the 100 metropolitan areas surveyed.

Moreover, Manpower said that its report showed, for the first time since 2008, two consecutive quarters of labor market improvement in all 13 industries and in all four regions surveyed -- Northeast, Midwest, West and South.

Despite the recent slowdown in hiring, "job growth has proven to be sustainable," said Jonas Prising, the company's president, who expects "continued progress."

Of the 18,000 employers polled, 21 percent said that they expect to hire more workers during the third quarter. That's up from 18 percent during the three months ending June.

Industries where the most hiring is anticipated to occur include, based on the percentage of positive-hiring responses by employers:

Even hard-hit industries related to homebuilding are expected to hire in coming weeks and months. The surveyed showed:

  • 12 percent of construction firms plan to bring on more workers.
  • 15 percent of manufacturers of durable goods, which include household appliances, also plan to hire.

Though the report was largely positive, the Manpower report showed that 8 percent of employers expect to decrease staffing levels in the third quarter. That's 2 percent more than in the two previous quarters.





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