Queen Anne House: A Turreted, Transitional Design

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By Bud Dietrich

At the end of the 19th century and early into the 20th, a popular home style in the United States was the Queen Anne. The Queen Anne was clearly a transitional style, creating a bridge between the exuberant Victorian and the restrained Colonial revival styles.

The Queen Anne home is characterized by its asymmetrical design. With a large projecting gable on one side and a tower on the other, the Queen Anne is a tall, upright and proud house.

At its base, the Queen Anne has a wide porch that welcomes the visitor and provides a place to rest and view the street. An abundance of large windows keeps the interior of the Queen Anne light and bright.

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Queen Anne House: A Turreted, Transitional Design (PHOTOS)


This classic Queen Anne has a tower, projecting gable roof and front porch. From its Palladian window in the gable to its Hindustani inspired tower roof, this Queen Anne typifies the eclecticism of its day.

Here is a more restrained Queen Anne, this time painted all white to reflect the approaching popularity of the Colonial Revival.

The porch on a Queen Anne is one of its more important spaces. Here it swells to create a large space for family and friends to enjoy the outdoors and watch the world go by.

This Queen Anne includes the trademark projecting gable roof, a turret that turns the corner, and an abundance of windows. It does not, however, have the wide porch at its base, but a more classically inspired front entry that fits its more formal  context.

Smaller, tighter and more restrained due to its urban setting, this Queen Anne shares the large projecting gable roof of its suburban siblings.

Sometimes the tower on the Queen Anne house was stunted, as if a tall vertical gesture was just too much exuberance. No matter -- that wonderful round or octagonal shape makes its impact even without a lot of height.

This is definitely not a Queen Anne -- it's more exuberant, articulated and eclectic. Comparing this home to the one in the previous slide shows the difference between a Queen Anne and a Victorian.

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