10 States With the Most Mortgage Debt

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foreclosure signHow much residents of each state owe on their mortgages is an interesting statistic. For the most part, residents of the states with the highest average mortgage debt are not in trouble. While the average home price in these states dropped in value during the recession, the foreclosure rates in these states are among the lowest in the country. The reason: Residents of these states can generally afford to lose and owe more money than their counterparts in other states. (Click the gallery below to see the full list.)

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States With the Worst Mortgage Debt
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10 States With the Most Mortgage Debt

By Michael B. Sauter, 24/7 Wall Street

Mortgage debt per person: $196,911
Median household income: $51,001 (19th highest)
Credit card debt per person: $6,145 (seventh lowest)
Change in home value (2006-2010): -44.5 percent (biggest decline)


No state had a more dramatic downfall in its housing market during the recession than Nevada. In 2006, nearly 40,000 building permits were approved in the state, a nation-high average of 15.8 per 1,000 people. By 2010, the number of permits declined 80 percent and median home values dropped 44.5 percent. This has left thousands of homeowners with underwater mortgages. According to Credit Karma, Nevada residents owe an average of $196,911 on their mortgages. But unlike residents of most of the other states with high debt, many Nevada residents are not affluent enough to shoulder this burden. The state has the highest unemployment rate in the country, 13 percent, and a median income that is only 19th highest in the U.S.


Pictured: Las Vegas

Mortgage debt per person: $198,117
Median household income: $54,046 (15th highest)
Credit card debt per person: $7,533 (fifth highest)
Change in home value (2006-2010): +1.6 percent (31st smallest increase)


Colorado’s average mortgage debt of just under $200,000 is the ninth-highest in the country. The state’s average credit card debt of $7,533 per person is the fifth-highest. Residents, however, have been able to pay some of these massive debts on time, as Coloradans also boast one of the best average credit scores in the country. However, the state had the 12th-highest foreclosure rate in the country in December. While not as wealthy as some of the other states with extremely high personal debt, Colorado is certainly better off than Nevada. Poverty and unemployment are both quite low in the state.


Pictured: Phoenix, Nev.

Mortgage debt per person: $211,516
Median household income: $64,032 (fourth highest)
Credit card debt per person: $7,730 (third highest)
Change in home value (2006-2010): -3.4 percent (13th biggest decline)


In 2006, Connecticut had the second fewest building permits per person issued, behind only Rhode Island. This suggests that fewer people were buying homes that they could not afford at the height of the housing bubble. Indeed, just one in every 1,145 homes were foreclosed on in the state in December, a much lower figure compared to states such as Nevada and California, where the foreclosure rates in December were 1 in 177 and 1 in 254, respectively. Along with the eighth-highest mortgage debt per person in the country, Connecticut also ranks third-highest both in credit card debt and student debt. Nevertheless, the average resident’s credit score is the ninth-highest in the country, meaning state residents can pay off their debts. Connecticut has the fifth-lowest poverty rate in the country, and the fourth-highest median income.


Pictured: Waterbury, Connecticut

Mortgage debt per person: $221,873
Median household income: $60,674 (eighth highest)
Credit card debt per person: $7,298 (ninth highest)
Change in home value (2006-2010): +2 percent (21st biggest increase)


The average Virginia resident has $221,516 in mortgage debt, the seventh-greatest amount of that debt in the country. This does not include the additional $50,000 in debt the average resident has accumulated between their credit cards, car payments and student loans. However, the average household makes more than $60,000 per year, the eighth-most in the country, and so, to a certain extent, Virginians are able to afford their IOUs. The average credit score in the state of 670 is the 10th-best in the country.

Pictured: Centreville, Va.

Mortgage debt per person: $224,661
Median household income: $62,072 (sixth highest)
Credit card debt per person: $6,851 (16th highest)
Change in home value (2006 – 2010): -9.8 percent (eighth biggest decline)


Massachusetts has the fifth-highest median home value of $334,100, which explains why the average resident owes nearly $225,000 in mortgage payments. But with the state boasting the sixth-highest median income and ninth-lowest poverty, residents are generally able to pay off their debts. While the number of new building projects has not declined as much as the rest of the country, home values still declined nearly 10 percent between 2006 and 2010. This decline affected some homeowners, demonstrated by the fact that the state had the 20th-highest foreclosure rate in the country last year.


Pictured: Boston

Mortgage debt per person: $225,581
Median household income: $55,681 (11th highest)
Credit card debt per person: $6,825 (17th highest)
Change in home value (2006-2010): +1.6 percent (32nd biggest gain)


While Washington has the fifth-highest mortgage debt per person in the country, state residents tend to be more frugal in their other finances. Compared to other states, Washington has only the 17th highest credit card and auto debt per capita, and has the 13th-lowest student debt. Washington’s median home value in 2010 was the ninth highest in the country. Home values actually increased 1.6 percent during the recession. As a result, foreclosures in the state are low, despite the fact that the state has the 16th-highest unemployment rate in the country and a high poverty rate of 12.5 percent.


Pictured: Seattle

Mortgage debt per person: $236,017
Median household income: $67,681 (second highest)
Credit card debt per person: $7,608 (fourth highest)
Change in home value (2006-2010): -7.5 percent (ninth biggest decline)


Most of the states hit hardest by the housing crash had a great deal of new buildings approved in the first half of the decade. This was the case in places like Nevada, California and Arizona. Because all of these new buildings were built at peak home prices, they had the furthest to fall when home prices collapsed. New Jersey, however, had the ninth-fewest building permits approved in 2006. Nevertheless, median home prices declined nearly $30,000, or the ninth most in the country. However, since residents have the second-highest median income in the U.S., they have been able to bear the loss in their home values. New Jersey had the ninth-fewest foreclosures in the country in December.

Pictured: Camden, N.J.

Mortgage debt per person: $242,445
Median household income: $68,854 (the highest)
Credit card debt per person: $7,226 (10th highest)
Change in home value (2006-2010): -9.9 percent (seventh biggest decline)


According to Credit Karma, the average mortgage debt per person in Maryland is nearly $250,000. This is at least partly a result of the fact that the state has the fifth-highest median home value in the U.S., as well as the highest median household income in the country. Like New Jersey, Maryland had a very small number of homes built before the recession. Also like New Jersey, home values still declined significantly. Nevertheless, wealthy Maryland residents have been able to weather the worst of this decline. The state had the 12th-fewest foreclosures in December, and the average credit score per resident is 12th best.


Pictured: East Baltimore, Md.

Mortgage debt per person: $307,508
Median household income: $63,030 (fifth highest)
Credit card debt per person: $7,527 (seventh highest)
Change in home value (2006-2010): -0.8 percent (15th biggest decline)


Hawaii has the highest median home value in the country at $525,000. This is $154,000 more than the next highest state. Needless to say, taking out a mortgage on a home in the island state is a tremendous financial commitment. But with extremely low unemployment, high median income, low poverty and the second-highest rate of health insurance coverage in the country, Hawaii homeowners can generally afford it.


Pictured:  Honolulu

Mortgage debt per person: $313,749
Median household income: $57,708 (ninth highest)
Credit card debt per person: $6,434 (30th highest)
Change in home value (2006-2010): -30.8 percent (2nd biggest decline)


While most of the residents of the states with the highest mortgage debt have been able to support the massive mortgages despite the fact that their homes have lost significant value, California is a different story. In 2006, California had the most expensive homes in the country, with a median home value of $532,000. By 2010, that value had declined by $164,000 — more than 30 percent. The effects of this massive decline in home prices had wide-reaching effects on the state economy. Unemployment in California is now the second-highest in the country, and 14.5 percent of the population lives below the poverty line. The average mortgage debt per person of $313,749 has been too much for thousands of residents. In December alone, one in every 252 homes was foreclosed upon.


Pictured:  Moreno Valley, Calif.


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24/7 Wall St. examined a recent report by Credit Karma to find the 10 states with the highest average mortgage debt. Most of the states on our list have extremely high mortgage debt because of the size of their initial mortgages. States like Connecticut and Massachusetts, which have among the highest median home values in the U.S., also have among the highest mortgage debt. Hawaii, which has the second-highest average mortgage debt per person, has the highest median home value of $525,400.

Many of the states on the list also experienced the steepest declines in home value during the recession. Home prices in seven of the states with the highest mortgage debt declined during the recession. In states like California and Nevada, properties lost more than 30 percent of their value. Even in states like New Jersey and Maryland, which fared relatively well during the recession, homes lost between 7 percent and 10 percent of their value.

Sharp declines in home values, coupled with high mortgage debt, should translate to financial disaster. However, while home values dropped more than 7 percent in Maryland, Massachusetts and New Jersey -- states where mortgage debt is the highest -- foreclosure rates stayed low.

Meanwhile, states with the lowest median home value and relatively high mortgage debt tend to have the highest foreclosure rates. Illinois, Michigan and Florida all have median home values below the national average and relatively high mortgage debt compared to housing prices in the state. These states also have among the highest foreclosure rates in the country.

More from 24/7 Wall St.:
10 Cities Crushed by the Global Recession
Americans Want Federal Aid for Housing, But Lack Ideas
Worst Cities for Retirees to Find Work

Also see:
Report: Foreclosures Down, But Discounts Abound
New Home Sales 2011: Worst Year on Record

22 PHOTOS
Best Cities to Buy Real Estate in 2012
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10 States With the Most Mortgage Debt

After bidding farewell to 2011, Realtors, investors and regulators the world over are no doubt wondering: Will 2012 be the year the real estate market finally rides out the aftershocks of the housing bust and mounts a full-on recovery?

There are indications that it could be. Big-time investors say that they're bullish on real estate and recent figures showing that pending home sales are at an 18-month high lend credence that view.

But even if home prices don't trend up nationwide, certain markets seem almost guaranteed to do well. Looking at a variety of sources, AOL Real Estate brings you 10 of this year's most promising housing markets for 2012. 

Location: Pittsburgh
Price: $299,900
Beds/Baths: 3/2
Sq. Ft.: N/A

MSN Real Estate lists Pittsburgh as one of the best housing markets in the U.S., pointing out that the steel town suffered practically no price decline following the housing bust and that its prices are projected to begin gaining ground relatively soon. 

This brick colonial typifies the sort of deal that you can expect to find on the higher end of Pittsburgh's market.  

See the listing for more details

Like many Northeastern homes, its interior has a bit of an Old World feel

See the listing for more details

Location: Worcester, Mass. 
Price: $300,000
Beds/Baths: 4/3
Sq Ft: 2,730

Tech companies are driving job growth in Worcester, according to MSN Real Estate. That may help real estate prices, which slipped 3 percent this past year, but are expected to tick up 2 percent in 2013. 

Spanning a generous 2,730 square feet, this alternatively colored home was built in 1987 and is equipped with its very own "game room," according to the listing. 

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The home features hardwood floors and a well-equipped kitchen, with ample cabinetry. There's also a sliding glass door that leads to a porch overlooking the back yard.

See the listing for more details

Location: Kansas City, Kan. 
Price: $199,000
Beds/Baths: 4/3
Sq. Ft.: 2,123

Realtor magazine ranks Kansas City, Kan., as the most promising housing market of 2012. HousingPredictor, which the magazine used for its rankings, estimates that the Midwestern city will see its real estate prices appreciate by 5.8 percent in 2012. 

Priced at $94 a square foot, this four-bedroom delivers everything you need.

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Pictured here is the home's generously sized kitchen. 

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Location: Topeka, Kan. 
Price: $429,000
Beds/Baths: 5/5
Sq. Ft.: 4,782

Kansas seems to have fared better than most through the real estate storm. Another one of the state's major cities, Topeka is predicted to post the second-highest increase in real estate prices, according to Realtor magazine.

Here is a sprawling home in Topeka, one of the ritzier houses in town. The $429,000 home offers five bedrooms and 4,782 total square feet. 

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The home comes with a large living space bathed in sunlight through its giant windows. 

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Location: El Paso, Texas
Price: $525,000
Beds/Baths: 5/4
Sq. Ft.: 3,767

El Paso is one of a host of Texas real estate markets that have fared well during the housing crisis. HousingPredictor projects a 3.2 percent increase in home prices this year. 

This groovy, fortress-like new traditional is priced at $525,000.

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The interior has a slick modern feel. Texas chic, if you will. 

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Location: Huntington, W.Va.
Price: $175,000
Beds/Baths: 4/3
Sq. Ft.: 1,804

On the hunt for new digs in a market that's turned the corner of the housing slump? Look no further than Huntington, W.Va. HousingPredictor expects the town's real estate prices to climb by 4 percent this year. 

Throw down $175,000 for this handsome 1/3-acre property, and enjoy a thoughtful interior as well as verdant surroundings. 

See more photos of this home

Sink your teeth into this kitchen.

Want tips on how to master real estate photography? Read some tips from a pro

Or see the listing for more details

Location: Charleston, W.Va. 
Price: $349,000
Beds/Baths: 4/3
Sq. Ft.: 3,716

Charleston clocks in at third on Realtor magazine's rankings of this year's most promising real estate markets. HousingPredictor expects a 4.5 percent increase. 

Search this town and you may find yourself mulling a neat property like this 3,716-square-foot four-bedroom. 

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The home offers elegant decor with dark hardwood floors and arched doorways. 

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Location: Bismarck, N.D. 
Price: $493,500
Beds/Baths: 3/6
Sq. Ft.: 3,089

Bismarck, N.D., is also expected to perform well in the real estate market this year. HousingPredictor estimates a 3.6 percent increase in home prices there.

This home's exterior reminds us that along with some serious deals there's a tradeoff: You're going to have to cope with some very harsh winters. 

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Don't expect to have to walk very far for a restroom in this home: Its bathroom-to-bedroom ratio is 2 to 1. 

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Location: University Place, Wash. 
Price: $439,090
Beds/Baths: 3/2
Sq. Ft.: 2,058

A tip of the hat to DailyFinance for directing us to Tacoma, Wash., a city whose real estate prices are set to skyrocket, according to a Fiserv prediction. The financial services information provider projects that prices in Tacoma will jump a staggering 24.9 percent. 

Located in University Place, a suburb just outside of Tacoma, this listing offers a taste of the sort of homes that may benefit from the price boom. 

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Constructed just a year ago, the home is practically brand new. Pictured here is the house's chicly lit kitchen. 

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Location: Memphis, Tenn. 
Price: $635,000
Beds/Baths: 5/6
Sq. Ft.: N/A

Fistserv also ranks Memphis, Tenn., as one of the most promising real estate markets of the year, predicting that the city's real estate prices will appreciate by 10 percent. 

This pricey home will bring you an acre of lush land, plus a down country five-bedroom that dates back to the 1950s. 

See the listing for details

The contemporary delivers a pool, some woodland and a colorful interior. 

See more photos of the listing

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