U.K.'s Speed Roommating Finds a Place in New York

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon


Someone once told me that you're not a true New Yorker until you've had one really bad roommate experience. If we're going by that criterion alone, then this means I'm a true New Yorker about six times over.

From messiness, to weird habits, to downright creepiness (ever had a roommate who preferred watching TV au naturel -- in a shared studio?), trying to find someone compatible to share an apartment with can be a stressful and harrowing experience, particularly in large cities like New York.

But not if the folks at SpeedRoommating have anything to do with it. The overwhelmingly popular U.K.-based SpeedRoommating service, which aims to ease the search for compatible roommates by providing a fun, safe, social setting for potential roommates to get acquainted, has announced that it's setting up shop in New York City.

According to SpeedRoomating's Matt Hutchison, the service's simple concept (inspired by the idea of speed dating) will save New Yorkers from commuting back and forth across the city, inspecting apartments -- only to discover that the roommates just aren't a good fit. The service's selling point is that in a single, one-hour, casual bar event, they will be able to meet a number of potential candidates in the time it would normally take to review a single apartment.

"Sharing an apartment is all about people, so it makes sense to meet them first," explains Hutchison. "If you're buying a place, then price and location are the most important factors. But if you're sharing it's more about who you'll share with -- an amazing apartment shared with roommates you don't like is never as good as an OK apartment with great roommates."

The idea was born in 2004 by Gemma Allen-Muncey, the director of the widely successful SpareRoom.com, who thought that adding a "speed dating" element to the roommate-finding process would be interesting. Seven years later, over 10,000 people have attended SpeedRoommating events in London alone (where it's called "SpeedFlatmating"). The concept has also been widely copied across the globe, even in Baltimore, Maryland where similar nonprofit-run speed roommating events have proven highly successful.

And next month, SpeedRoommating will descend upon New York City.

"New York has many of the same problems as London," Hutchison says of the company's decision to launch in the Big Apple. "It's big, expensive and there's a constant stream of new people moving to the city all year-round. The best places tend to go quickly, so getting a chance to meet lots of roommates in one go speeds up the process."

Hutchison revealed that SpeedRoommating's first Manhattan event will be held sometime in January to coincide with the launch of SpareRoom.com New York. Though the official event date hasn't yet been confirmed (it will be announced on the website by the end of the year), SpeedRoommating already has created a lot of buzz thanks to an active Twitter feed and word-of-mouth.

"I'd definitely check it out," says 24-year-old Lauren Rodrigue, a Brooklyn resident currently seeking a new apartment via Craigslist. "Finding roommates is one of the hardest parts of moving to New York and it sounds like this would make that process a little more palatable. Especially if drinks are involved."

UPDATE: The official date of the SpeedRoommating launch event has been confirmed for Wednesday, January 11, at Gossip Bar on 733 Ninth Avenue. The event runs from 7:00pm - 9:00pm and entry is free (with a complimentary drink). You must RSVP online.

Click on the images below to see apartments for rent in New York, N.Y.



11 PHOTOS
10 Best Cities to Live in Without a Car
See Gallery
U.K.'s Speed Roommating Finds a Place in New York

> Transit coverage: 69.4 percent (36th highest)
> Service frequency (minutes): 8.9 (16th lowest)
> Jobs reachable in 90 minutes: 30.2 percent (43rd highest)
> Walk score: 79.2 (third highest)
> Commuters who bike: 0.7 percent (21st highest)


See homes for sale in Boston.


The Boston-Cambridge-Quincy metropolitan area’s greatest strength for those without an automobile is the prevalence of dense, easily manageable communities. This makes it exceptionally easy for residents to reach amenities such as groceries, restaurants, shopping and schools. The metropolitan area’s primary city, Boston, has the third-highest walk score in the country. The area’s public transit also has a relatively high service frequency rate, making its use that much more convenient for the city’s residents.

> Transit coverage: 96 percent (second highest)
> Service frequency (minutes): 6.2 (second lowest)
> Jobs reachable in 90 minutes: 25.6 percent (69th highest)
> Walk score: 65.9 (14th highest)
> Commuters who bike: 0.87 percent (14th highest)


See homes for sale in Los Angeles.


Los Angeles is the second largest city by population in the United States, and its metropolitan area is fairly spread out. Due to its extensive public transit system the area has avoided a complete automobile-based culture. The metro area’s 19 transit systems have more than 500 bus routes. As a result, 96 percent of neighborhoods are within 0.75 miles to a transit stop -- the second highest rate in the country. Better still, commuters can catch a form of public transportation from their nearest stop every 6.2 minutes.

> Transit coverage: 89 percent (eighth highest)
> Service frequency (minutes): 8.5 (11th lowest)
> Jobs reachable in 90 minutes: 58.9 percent (2nd highest)
> Walk score: 57.6 (29th highest)
> Commuters who bike: 0.78 percent (17th highest)


See homes for sale in Salt Lake City.


Utah’s population is expected to grow from 2010’s approximately 3 million to 4.4 million in 2030. Salt Lake County accounts for more than one-third of the state’s population. To accommodate this growth, the Utah Transit Authority has plans to add four more lines to its light rail system, TRAX, up from its current three lines. This investment is meant to improve transportation for the suburban and exurban population to the city. In the winter, the UTA runs ski transit lines in addition to its rail and bus services.

> Transit coverage: 83.7 percent (12th highest)
> Service frequency (minutes): 8.1 (10th lowest)
> Jobs reachable in 90 minutes: 47.5 percent (10th highest)
> Walk score: 60.4 (23rd highest)
> Commuters who bike: 0.79 percent (16th highest)


See homes for sale in Denver.


Denver has bus service, light rail lines and an airport shuttle service. The city is currently undergoing a multibillion dollar expansion of its transit system, called the FasTracks Expansion. This plan is meant to increase light rail, commuter rail and bus rapid-transit lines. The project, which is expected to be completed in 2019, currently faces a $2 billion shortfall.

> Transit coverage: 95.6 percent (third highest)
> Service frequency (minutes): 6.9 (fifth lowest)
> Jobs reachable in 90 minutes: 58.4 percent (third highest)
> Walk score: 54.5 (34th highest)
> Commuters who bike: 1.56 percent (seventh highest)


See homes for sale in San Jose.


The San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara metropolitan area’s public transportation is overseen by the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority. Like Los Angeles, the area relies heavily on buses, running about 100 routes. Public transit covers 95.6 percent of neighborhoods, the third greatest in the country. Public vehicles also run under seven minutes apart, the fifth smallest frequency. The metro area also has the seventh highest rate of commuters who travel to work by bicycle.

> Transit coverage: 85.3 percent (11th highest)
> Service frequency (minutes): 8.8 (15th lowest)
> Jobs reachable in 90 minutes: 33.4 percent (35th highest)
> Walk score: 73.6 (sixth highest)
> Commuters who bike: 1.07 percent (ninth highest)


See homes for sale in Seattle.


Seattle’s public transportation system not only includes bus and rail transit, but a monorail in the city center, as well as ferries. The city also has the sixth highest walk score in the country, due to its high number of easily accessible amenities. According to Bicycling magazine, Seattle is one of the most bike-friendly cities in the country and “has a 10-year, $240-million bike master plan that seeks to triple the number of journeys made by bike and add 450 miles of bike paths.”

> Transit coverage: 97 percent (the highest)
> Service frequency (minutes): 9 (18th highest)
> Jobs reachable in 90 minutes: 59.8 percent (the highest)
> Walk score: 63 (19th highest)
> Commuters who bike: 0.95 percent (12th highest)


See homes for sale in Honolulu.


Honolulu currently does not have an urban rail system, but its bus system helps cover 97 percent of neighborhoods — the highest rate in the country. Additionally, almost 60 percent of jobs are accessible within 90 minutes to those who live in neighborhoods covered by transit. This is also the highest rate in the country. Nevertheless, the city is planning a $5.5 billion rail project called the Honolulu Rail Transit Project. This will include 20 miles of track, connecting East Kapolei with the Honolulu International Airport and downtown Honolulu and will end at Ala Moana Center.

> Transit coverage: 89.6 percent (seventh highest)
> Service frequency (minutes): 4.5 (the highest)
> Jobs reachable in 90 minutes: 36.6 percent (25th highest)
> Walk score: 85.3 (the highest)
> Commuters who bike: 0.52 percent (32nd highest)


See homes for sale in New York.


New York City and its surroundings rank first in the nation for total number of passenger trips and government spending per capita on public transit, according to U.S. News. It also has the highest rate of service frequency. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s 2010 operating budget was $13.4 billion. The average weekday ridership for the city is estimated to be over 8.4 million trips. The city also has the highest walk score on this list, thanks to the ability of city dwellers to reach just about any amenity on foot.

> Transit coverage: 83.5 percent (13th highest)
> Service frequency (minutes): 7.4 (eighth lowest)
> Jobs reachable in 90 minutes: 39.9 percent (16th highest)
> Walk score: 66.3 (13th highest)
> Commuters who bike: 2.23 percent (second highest)


See homes for sale in Portland.


Portland is such a good place for people to live without a car due to both its public transit system and the ease of walking and biking around the city. The metropolitan area is served by TriMet, which in addition to other services offers a Free Rail Zone — a region that includes most of downtown Portland and where light rail and streetcar rides are always free. The city has a number of benefits for bike riders, including designated bike-only areas at traffic signals and free bike lights. It has the second highest rate of commuters who ride bikes to work in the country.

> Transit coverage: 91.7 percent (fifth highest)
> Service frequency (minutes): 8.5 (12th highest)
> Jobs reachable in 90 minutes: 34.8 (30th highest)
> Walk score: 84.9 (second highest)
> Commuters who bike: 1.65 percent (sixth highest)


See homes for sale in San Francisco.


San Francisco is held in high regard for its many successful transit systems, including the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Authority and the Bay Area Rapid Transit district. These systems cover nearly 92 percent of neighborhoods -- the fifth highest rate in the country. San Francisco also has the second highest walk score and is excellent for bicyclists. Commuter rails within the city allow bicyclists to mount with their bicycles, and there is a bike shuttle across the Bay Bridge to help cyclists during rush hour.

of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

More on AOL Real Estate:
Find rentals in your area.
Find out how to calculate mortgage payments.
Find
homes for sale in your area.
Find
foreclosures in your area.
Read Full Story

Find a New Home

Buy
Rent
Value
Powered by Zillow

From Our Partners