Job Interview: What to Do Before, During and After Your Interview

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job-interviewJob interviews can be overwhelming at times. Sometimes it seems like there is so much to remember. Forgetting one important detail could be the deal breaker so it pays to be prepared. I turned to Carole Martin, the Interview Coach, for some tips on what to do before, during, and after the job interview.


Upon arrival to your job interview
  • Arrive early, but do not enter the building until 10 minutes before your appointment.
  • Review your preparation stories and answers.
  • Go to the restroom and run cool water on your hands and inside your wrists to cool your hands down. Check your appearance once again.
  • Announce yourself to the receptionist in a professional manner (Don't underestimate the receptionist's opinion).
  • Stand and greet your interviewer with a hearty (not bone crusher) handshake.
  • Smile and look into the interviewer's eyes -- note the color.
-- Applying for jobs? Find out what they pay.

During the job interview
  • Be as enthusiastic as your personality will allow; bringing energy to the interview will help the interviewer and you.
  • Try to focus on the points you have prepared without being too rehearsed and stiff.
  • Relax and enjoy the conversation. Learn what you can about the company and whether you would like to work there.
  • Ask questions and listen, not only to what is said, but trying to read between the lines.
  • At the conclusion of the interview, thank the interviewer for his/her time and find out what the next step will be.

After the job interview
  • As soon as possible after leaving the building, write down what you are thinking and feeling. Let it all flow and then put it away. The interview is over. Do not dwell on the situation.
  • Later in the day, or the next day, look at what you wrote and assess how you did. What you will do differently next time – what worked and what didn't.
  • Sit down and write a follow-up letter. Thank the interviewer for the opportunity, remind the interviewer of the qualities you would bring to this position, and address any concerns or issues that surfaced during the interview. This is another chance for you to sell yourself.

Next:10 Types of Interviewers

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