Most Dangerous Cities for Pedestrians

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Watch your step in Florida: Orlando, Tampa, Miami and Jacksonville were just ranked top four most dangerous cities for walkers according to a new Transportation for America study. The organization hopes to draw attention to the 5,000 accidental deaths a year due to pedestrian un-friendly roads. The study is timed to strike a nerve in the national consciousness as major cities like Manhattan strive to get more European by adding bike lanes and the awareness that walking and biking can help prevent obesity, heart disease and even climate change increases. Even musician David Byrne has become a bike evangelist.

But how did TFA come up with their numbers? And what does that mean for renters?
They evaluated the Pedestrian Danger Index which looks at the number of pedestrian deaths relative to the number of walkers in a city. So even though Orlando has few walkers, they face greater danger because the pedestrian death toll was high proportionately. The top 10 most dangerous pedestrian cities are all in the south and all have less-than-ideal infrastructure for walkers. Also, not surprising, they're the cities that spent the smallest amounts of their federal transportation dollars on pedestrian safety.

The Top 10 Most Dangerous Pedestrian Cities
1. Orlando
2. Tampa
3. Miami
4. Jacksonville
5. Memphis
6. Raleigh
7. Louisville
8. Houston
9. Birmingham
10. Atlanta

The Top 10 Safest Pedestrian Cities

1. Minneapolis-St. Paul
2. Boston
3. New York
4. Pittsburgh
5. Seattle
6. Rochester
7. Cincinnati
8. Hartford
9. Portland
10. Cleveland

Ever consider the walkability of your apartment? WalkScore.com will access it for you and let you know how you rank nationally. If you're looking to move, consider how bike or pedestrian friendly the neighborhood is. If you just moved and don't know a safe route to the store, find one on MapMyWalk.com or MapMyRide.com. Or try good old Google Maps, which allows you to search a route by foot (in addition to public transportation and car). Walking to the store may help you reduce the amount you have to drive to the gym.

via Morning Edition


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