Banks declare war on hats, hoodies and sunglasses

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sunglassesWe've all seen signs warning customers that if they come into a store or restaurant without a shirt or shoes, they will be refused service. Well, banks -- at least some banks near Cincinnati, my neck of the woods -- will soon be posting signs requesting that customers take off their hat and sunglasses and lower the hood on their hooded sweatshirt before approaching the teller, according to The Mansfield News.

The actual sign at a number of banks throughout Clermont County, Ohio, will read: "For the safety of customers and employees, the Miami Township Police Department requests you Do Not wear or have these items in this business." In addition to hats, sunglasses, and hooded sweatshirts, the use of cell phones may also be discouraged, as theoretically a robber could use the cell phone to contact his buddy in a getaway car.

The FBI has said that they expect these signs to become the standard in Ohio.

The impetus for this sign is the 23 bank holdups that have taken place in the Greater Cincinnati area, this year. And most robbers tend to wear clothing that disguise their facial features without calling too much attention to them. This is why we don't see too many men and women standing in line at a bank, wearing a ski mask.

Most of this seems pretty reasonable to me. A lot of people wear sunglasses in the summer, but there's no compelling reason to wear them inside. Hats, from a manners standpoint, should come off once inside, and wearing sunglasses and the hood on a hooded sweatshirt has that Unabomber quality to it.

But asking people at banks to put down their cell phones? That could get kind of touchy.

In any case, the next time you approach your bank wearing your shades, hat, and hoodie, regardless of where you do your banking in the country, you may want to remove them. Or not. But if the teller eyes you suspiciously, at least you'll know why.
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