Worst States for Job Growth 2007

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

CareerBuilder.com writer

Job hunting falls under the same category as moving, paying bills, errands and homework -- it sucks, but you gotta do it.

To add to an already lousy situation, there's a serious lack of available positions in some regions of the United States. Workers often feel stuck in a rut because A) the available jobs don't pay well enough, B) they aren't qualified for the job or C) the openings aren't in the job seeker's desired industry.

Unemployment rates (the ratio between the numbers of available jobs to the population of an area) are a huge thing to consider when searching for a job in your area. The national unemployment rate as of July 2007 is 4.6 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Overall, seven states and the District of Columbia reported significantly higher rates of unemployment than the national average. Throughout the year, jobless rates declined in 27 states, rose in 18 states and were unchanged in five states. The Midwest posted the highest jobless rate (5.3 percent) among the regions.

Having trouble finding a job in your home state? These 15 states harbor the highest unemployment rates in the nation, according to the BLS. Are you living in one of them?


Michigan
Unemployment rate: 7.2 percent*
Mean annual wage: $41,230*
Industry with largest percentage of workers: Trade, transportation and utilities (18.3 percent)*


Ohio
Unemployment rate: 6.1 percent
Mean annual wage: $37,360
Industry with largest percentage of workers: Trade, transportation and utilities (19.2 percent)


Mississippi
Unemployment rate: 6.0 percent
Mean annual wage: $30,460
Industry with largest percentage of workers: Government (21.2 percent)


Alaska
Unemployment rate: 5.9 percent
Mean annual wage: $43,920
Industry with largest percentage of workers: Government (25.6 percent)


District of Columbia
Unemployment rate: 5.6 percent
Mean annual wage: $61,500
Industry with largest percentage of workers: Government (33.4 percent)


South Carolina
Unemployment rate: 5.5 percent
Mean annual wage: $33,400
Industry with largest percentage of workers: Trade, transportation and utilities (19.4 percent)


Kentucky
Unemployment rate: 5.4 percentMean annual wage: $33,490
Industry with largest percentage of workers: Trade, transportation and utilities (20.5 percent)


California
Unemployment rate: 5.2 percentMean annual wage: $44,180
Industry with largest percentage of workers: Trade, transportation and utilities (19 percent)


Oregon
Unemployment rate: 5.1 percent
Mean annual wage: $38,570
Industry with largest percentage of workers: Trade, transportation and utilities (19.9 percent)


Illinois
Unemployment rate: 5.1 percentMean annual wage: $40,910
Industry with largest percentage of workers: Trade, transportation and utilities (20 percent)


Wisconsin
Unemployment rate: 5 percentMean annual wage: $36,730
Industry with largest percentage of workers: Trade, transportation and utilities (19.2 percent)


Arkansas
Unemployment rate: 5 percentMean annual wage: $30,870
Industry with largest percentage of workers: Trade, transportation and utilities (20.7 percent)


North Carolina
Unemployment rate: 4.9 percent
Mean annual wage: $35,520Industry with largest percentage of workers: Trade, transportation and utilities (18.5 percent)


Massachusetts
Unemployment rate: 4.9 percent
Mean annual wage: $47,340
Industry with largest percentage of workers: Education and health services (19 percent)


Missouri
Unemployment rate: 4.8 percent
Mean annual wage: $35,670
Industry with largest percentage of workers: Trade, transportation and utilities (19.8 percent)


Next:13 Best Jobs in Hard Times >>

*Unemployment rates, mean annual wages and industry percentages obtained from BLS in June 2007. Percentages based on nonfarm payrolls, seasonally adjusted.


Copyright 2007 CareerBuilder.com.

Read Full Story

From Our Partners