Media World: Breaking wind all the way to the bank with new iPhone app

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Three college buddies from Philadelphia are making their dreams of creating the most realistic fart noises ever heard on an Apple Inc. (AAPL) iPhone into a reality. This is further proof of just how wide open the market for software applications for the world's hottest smartphone is right now.

Patrick Lutz, Mike McNasby, and Chris Wilcox, began offering the PrudeBox, which lets users hear a variety of fart and belching noises along with more "tame" bodily functions such as sneezing, last week. They have formed a side business called Alkali Media LLC to market PrudeBox and to develop other iPhone Apps.

"I can call my dad and fart in his ear," said Lutz, 23 (who works with my wife).

Lost amidst all of the hoopla over the billion iPhone applications downloads was any discussion for how the device enables juvenile and immature behavior to go high tech.

Getting onto the Apple website, though, was not easy. Apple rejected the earlier version of the program called "The Crude Box" which spoofed sounds of female orgasm. That annoyed the budding entrepreneurs, especially considering that the company approved applications with curse words in their titles. Songs and videos with that material seem to get listed on iTunes with little problem.

"We unanimously agreed that maybe it was the female orgasm sound that sent the app over the edge," the company said on its website. "The orgasm was replaced with a cartoon-like spring sound."

Following those changes, Apple gave the PrudeBox the thumbs up. The program, like most iPhone apps, sells for 99 cents and developers get about 70 cents per sale.

The PrudeBox already has plenty of competition from iFart, at one time the best-selling iPhone app, and Pull My Finger. In fact, the two fart program developers are engaged in a nasty legal battle that's bound to create a legal precedent -- or maybe not. PrudeBox offers a more user-friendly experience than its rivals, Lutz said.

"What sets us apart is the quality of the sounds," he said, adding that his app also offers more variety in crude noises than iFart and Pull My Finger, such as vomiting sounds.

There are other weird iPhone apps. iDare, a program where users try and avoid stabbing a cyber-hand with a cyber sharp pencil. The Sexy Ladies of Show magazine app allows people to take a closer look at their favorite scantily clad model and "zoom in on her top assets."

Alkali, though, plans to expand beyond its current slate of crude noises. The company is now recording sounds for a new app, which it is declining to discuss before its release. Lutz would only hint, they are "not of the bodily function persuasion."

Disclosure: DailyFinance recently launched its own iPhone app. Crude sound effects, not included.

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