Bobcats move in to abandoned home

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LAKE ELSINORE, Calif. (AP) - A family of bobcats has apparently moved into a vacant house in Lake Elsinore, proving that speculators aren't the only ones pouncing on good deals.

Residents of the upscale Tuscany Hills community first spotted the squatters last week sitting atop a wall outside the Spanish-style house. There are at least two adults and three kittens.

Neighbors say the house has been empty at least six months.

Someone called 911, reporting mountain lions after the bobcats were spotted. Police arrived to discover the bobcats, at least two adults and three kittens, living in the house.

Bobcats are not known to attack humans, Monique Middleton of Animal Friends of the Valley, which provides animal-control services, told the LA Times.

"But are they pussycats? No. Can they do a lot of damage? Yes," she told the newspaper. "They usually look for a food and water source, and there is an old koi pond in the backyard and that's where they are headed."

Once the kittens are old enough to travel, Middleton said, she expected the animals to move on.

Neighbor Scott Brown, who moved from Long Beach with his wife Karen to be close to nature, told the Times that the bobcats are "great neighbors, and as long as they don't want to baby-sit my kids, it's not a problem."

Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. The information contained in the AP news report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press. Active hyperlinks have been inserted by AOL.





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