Freeing a Sticking Door

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Doors stick when the hinges sag, when the door frame shifts, or when humidity causes the door and door frame to swell. If the door seems to be sagging within the frame, make sure the hinge screws are tight. Screws that are loose may need to have their screw holes repaired.
If the door continues to stick, you'll need to plane or sand the door edge at the point where the door touches

Doors stick when the hinges sag, when the door frame shifts, or when humidity causes the door and door frame to swell. If the door seems to be sagging within the frame, make sure the hinge screws are tight. Screws that are loose may need to have their screw holes repaired.

If the door continues to stick, you'll need to plane or sand the door edge at the point where the door touches the door frame. After you're done, don't forget to refinish the edge of the door.

Step 1.

Drive the lower hinge pin out with a screwdriver and hammer. Hold the door in place and drive out the upper pin. Some hinges have an access hole in the bottom. To avoid marring the hinge finish, you can insert a nail or small Phillips screwdriver and drive the pin upward.

Step 2

Once the door is removed from its hinges, tighten any loose screws. If the wood behind the hinge will not hold the screws tightly, remove the hinges completely.

Step 3

Coat wooden golf tees or dowels with wood glue and then drive them into the worn screw holes. Let the glue dry completely and then cut off the excess wooden tee.

Step 4.

Drill pilot holes in the new wood and rehang the hinge with the new wood as a base for the screws.

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